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Terdoslavich adding catcher to his list of roles

Terdoslavich adding catcher to his list of roles

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- Joey Terdoslavich's ability to quickly prove himself as an outfielder allowed him to earn his first call to the Major League level last season. Now the Braves are planning to give the former third baseman a chance to further enhance his versatility.

Manager Fredi Gonzalez said that Terdoslavich will spend a portion of Spring Training working out with the catchers. The 25-year-old switch-hitter has not handled catching duties in a game since 2007, his senior year at Sarasota (Fla.) High School.

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"He's not going to be one of those guys we want to catch 140 games, but just to add that to his repertoire," Gonzalez said. "If he can get behind the plate as a third catcher and we use him off the bench, he's a very, very nice piece for us."

Once viewed as Chipper Jones' possible successor at third base, Terdoslavich spent the winter following the 2012 season learning how to play the outfield. That, combined with the fact that he hit 18 homers through just 85 games for Triple-A Gwinnett, allowed him to spend last season's final three months with Atlanta.

In addition to working in the outfield and at first base, Terdoslavich will spend the next few weeks working with catching coordinator Joe Breeden and bullpen coach Eddie Perez, who caught more than 500 games during his big league career.

Gonzalez is hoping to get Terdoslavich some time behind the plate at some point during a Grapefruit League game.

"I'm willing to do anything that can help me and possibly help the team," Terdoslavich said.

Terdoslavich will be spending the next six weeks battling for a spot on Atlanta's Opening Day roster. The odds of him realizing this goal will be influenced by the health of Tyler Pastornicky, who will be limited over the next few weeks as he recovers from surgery to repair a torn ACL in his left knee.

Mark Bowman is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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