Braves to let Schafer heal on disabled list

Braves to let Schafer heal on disabled list

ATLANTA -- Jordan Schafer was not happy to learn he had been placed on the disabled list on Thursday morning. The Braves wish they had made the decision to make the transaction before allowing Schafer to make two pinch-hit appearances during this week's series against the Marlins.

After watching Schafer struggle to run to first base during Wednesday night's loss to the Marlins, the Braves chose to put the backup outfielder on the DL with a right ankle contusion he has battled over the past week. Joey Terdoslavich was promoted from Triple-A Gwinnett to fill Schafer's spot on the 25-man roster.

"We thought he was getting better," Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez said. "Then yesterday, the way he ran to first base, why put him through that stuff? We'll just let him get healed and not have him worry about it."

Schafer has had limited mobility since fouling a pitch off his ankle during a June 26 game in Kansas City. The versatile outfielder favored his right leg when he beat out an infield single on Tuesday night, and again while grounding out on Wednesday night.

Had the Braves not used Schafer this week, he would have been eligible to come off the DL on July 12. But now he will not be eligible for activation until July 19, when the Braves play their first game after the All-Star break.

"If we hadn't used him, it still would have taken 15 [days]," Gonzalez said. "But now, at least we don't have to worry about it. Hindsight is always ..."

Schafer declined to discuss the decision when he was approached in the Braves' clubhouse on Thursday afternoon. Earlier in the day, he sent a tweet that indicated he did not know he was placed on the disabled list until he saw the news on Twitter.

Schafer has resuscitated his career, batting .312 with a .863 OPS in 146 plate appearances. His absence could lead to more playing opportunities for veteran backup outfielder Reed Johnson, who has made one start since May 28.

Mark Bowman is a reporter for MLB.com. Eric Single is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.