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Gonzalez OK with Hudson's frustrations following start

Gonzalez OK with Hudson's frustrations following start

Gonzalez OK with Hudson's frustrations following start

ATLANTA -- Fredi Gonzalez did not have a problem with the frustration Tim Hudson expressed in response to being pulled immediately after surrendering a game-tying, two-run home run in the sixth inning of Saturday's win over the D-backs.

"You don't want stuff like that out open in the press, but Huddy's a hell of a competitor," Gonzalez said. "He's one of the guys that in a battle, in a big game, you want him on the mound. So I'm fine with that."

Hudson was not pleased with Gonzalez's decision to remove him from after A.J. Pollock hit his 100th pitch over the center-field wall to tie the game. The 15-year veteran felt he had earned the right to at least attempt to record the final out and keep himself in line to record what would have been his first win since May 5.

The Braves veteran pitcher has compiled a 4.50 ERA while going winless in his past 10 starts.

"I would have liked the opportunity to have a decision," Hudson said after the Braves' 11-5 win. "A hundred pitches, to me is not really a magic number to take you out of the game. You work real hard the whole game. There's one pitch that a guy puts a good swing on, on a pitch away and ties the game up. Apparently, you need 16 years in the big leagues to get that chance."

"That doesn't bother me," Gonzalez said. "You don't want guys looking in [the dugout] every time, and through our careers, you've seen guys that way. Every time they throw a pitch, they're like, 'Hey, come get me. You got the guy warming up?' That's fine."

Hudson's four earned runs on Saturday were the most the right-hander had given up in June. He had compiled a 1.82 ERA in the previous five starts he had made this month.

"We have to make decisions," Gonzalez said. "Sometimes they're tough decisions, but you want guys that want to pick up the ball and want to be out there, you want position players that are a little beat up, but want to play. Those are the guys you really want, and then you have to make decisions according to that."

Eric Single is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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