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Chipper recalls vivid memories of San Francisco

Chipper recalls vivid memories of San Francisco

Chipper recalls vivid memories of San Francisco
SAN FRANCISCO -- As Chipper Jones prepared to begin his last scheduled series in San Francisco on Thursday night, he reminisced about time spent at Candlestick Park and the many times he experienced the thrill of competing against Barry Bonds.

Jones chuckled and smirked when asked if he has vivid memories of Bonds hitting two walk-off home runs during a three-game series against the Braves in 2003. Ray King surrendered the first. Two days later, Trey Hodges felt legendary manager Bobby Cox's wrath when he allowed Bonds to cap a memorable series in dramatic fashion.

"That was one of the few times I really remember Bobby really losing it," Jones said. "He exploded those [clubhouse] doors after the second one that Bonds hit. It was just a profanity-laced tirade that you don't often hear from him. But it was definitely one that whoever was in this clubhouse will remember for years to come."

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Jones also vividly remembers seeing Cox make the long walk down the right-field line to get to the clubhouse after getting ejected at Candlestick Park -- a stadium where Jones reached the 40-homer mark for the first and last time in 1999.

During playoff matchups in 2002 and 2010, Jones saw the great passion San Francisco fans have for their Giants. But it did not take a playoff setting for him to learn this fact. He laughed about some of the verbal jabs he received while playing left field, primarily during the 2002 and '03 seasons.

"I'll remember the treatment the fans give pretty much every left fielder out there in left field," Jones said. "It's not a place for women and children. I can tell you that. The playoff games that we played here, I've got a lot of memories of this place and they're not just at AT&T Park."

Before Thursday night's game, the Giants recognized Jones' final visit with a video tribute. Jones showed his appreciation by tipping his hat to the crowd.

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